New Books List

Publisher:

New York : Cambridge University Press, 2017.

Call Number:

KIC 341 C538I 2017

Pages:

xviii, 629 pages ; 24 cm.

Subject:

Law

Summary:
In International Law and World Order, B. S. Chimni articulates an integrated Marxist approach to international law (IMAIL), combining the insights of Marxism, socialist feminism, and postcolonial theory. The book uses this approach to systematically and critically examine the most influential contemporary theories of international law, including new, feminist, realist, and policy-oriented approaches. In doing so, it discusses a range of themes relating to the history, structure, and process of international law. The book also considers crucial world order issues and problems that the international legal process has to contend with, including the welfare of weak groups and nations, the ecological crisis, and the role of human rights. This extensively revised second edition provides an invaluable, in-depth and updated review of the key literature and scholarship within this field of study. It will be of particular interest to students and scholars of international law, international relations, international politics, and global studies.
Publisher:

New York : Routledge, 2018.

Call Number:

KIC 340 V429J 2018

Pages:

x, 338 pages ; 20 cm.

Subject:

Law

Summary:
Jurisprudence: Themes and Concepts offers an original introduction to, and critical analysis of, the central themes studied in jurisprudence courses. The book is presented in three parts: the first two contain general themes with corresponding tutorial questions, and the third contains advanced topics. Every chapter in the book gives guidance on further reading. Accessible, interdisciplinary and socially informed, this book has been revised to take into account the latest developments in jurisprudential scholarship.
Publisher:

New York : Cambridge University Press, 2012.

Call Number:

KIC 342 B224P 2012

Pages:

xxvi, 611 pages ; 24 cm.

Subject:

Law

Summary:
Having identified proportionality as the main tool for limiting constitutional rights, Aharon Barak explores its four components (proper purpose, rational connection, necessity and proportionality stricto sensu) and discusses the relationships between proportionality and reasonableness and between courts and legislation. He goes on to analyse the concept of deference and to consider the main arguments against the use of proportionality (incommensurability and irrationality). Alternatives to proportionality are compared and future developments of proportionality are suggested.