New Books List

Publisher:

New York : Seven Stories Press, 2008.

Call Number:

KIC 328.73092 G775P 2008

Pages:

287 pages, [8] pages of plates : illustration ; 21 cm.

Subject:

Social Sciences

Summary:
In this candid portrait, former two-term senator from Alaska and 2008 presidential candidate Mike Gravel expounds on his views of the military-industrial complex, the imperial presidency, postwar US foreign policy, and corporate America; critically assesses figures he worked with, such as Jimmy Carter and Ted Kennedy; and reveals the private life behind the public persona. When he wasn¿t being actively silenced, Senator Gravel¿s voice was generally acknowledged to be the most refreshing and honest of all the 2008 presidential candidates. Now as the post-Obama Democratic Party begins to slowly lean leftward, here is a telling memoir from a politician who has been fighting the good fight from the start.
Publisher:

Knoxville : University of Tennessee Press, 1987.

Call Number:

00 KIC 327.73 B924A 1987

Pages:

viii, 210 pages : illustration ; 22 cm.

Subject:

Social Sciences

Summary:
Today the struggle between two tendencies-traditional isolationist and moral expansionist-remains a central focus in our national life. General introductions to United States' diplomatic history in this era seldom mention the connections between American foreign relations and American military strategy and policies. Yet many of the foundations of our '' national security state'' were constructed in the 19149-1945 period. This provocative survey, one of the first attempts at such integration, outlines key developmets in the areas of american foreign relations and military strategy during these years.
Publisher:

Lanham : Rowman & Littlefield, 2009.

Call Number:

KIC 335.83 B211A 2009

Pages:

viii, 241 pages ; 24 cm.

Subject:

Social Sciences

Summary:
This original and impressively researched book explores the concept of anarchy¿"unimposed order"¿as the most humane and stable form of order in a chaotic world. Mohammed A. Bamyeh traces the historical foundations of anarchy and convincingly presents it as an alternative to both tyranny and democracy. He shows how anarchy is the best manifestation of civic order, of a healthy civil society, and of humanity's noblest attributes. The author contends that humanity thrives on self-regulation rather than imposed order, that large systems are inherently more prone to tyranny than small systems, that power is the enemy of freedom, and that freedom and community are complementary rather than opposing values. He concludes that a more rational world is produced not by delegated representatives but by direct participation in common affairs.
Publisher:

Stanford, California : Stanford University Press, 2015.

Call Number:

KIC 305.800973 J951B 2015

Pages:

x, 247 pages ; 23 cm.

Subject:

Social Sciences

Summary:
Racism has never been simple. It wasn't more obvious in the past, and it isn't less potent now. From the birth of the United States to the contemporary police shooting death of an unarmed Black youth, Beneath the Surface of White Supremacy investigates ingrained practices of racism, as well as unquestioned assumptions in the study of racism, to upend and deepen our understanding. In Moon-Kie Jung's unsettling book, Dred Scott v. Sandford, the notorious 1857 Supreme Court case, casts a shadow over current immigration debates and the "war on terror." The story of a 1924 massacre of Filipino sugar workers in Hawai'i pairs with statistical relentlessness of Black economic suffering to shed light on hidden dimensions of mass ignorance and indifference. The histories of Asians, Blacks, Latina/os, and Natives relate in knotty ways. State violence and colonialism come to the fore in taking measure of the United States, past and present, while the undue importance of assimilation and colorblindness recedes. Ultimately, Jung challenges the dominant racial common sense and develops new concepts and theory for radically rethinking and resisting racisms.
Publisher:

Chapel Hill, N.C. : University of North Carolina Press, 2000.

Call Number:

KIC 335.430917496 R658B 2000

Pages:

xxxiii, 436 pages ; 24 cm.

Subject:

Social Sciences

Summary:
In this ambitious work, first published in 1983, Cedric Robinson demonstrates that efforts to understand black people's history of resistance solely through the prism of Marxist theory are incomplete and inaccurate. Marxist analyses tend to presuppose European models of history and experience that downplay the significance of black people and black communities as agents of change and resistance. Black radicalism must be linked to the traditions of Africa and the unique experiences of blacks on western continents, Robinson argues, and any analyses of African American history need to acknowledge this.
Publisher:

New York : Seven Stories Press, 2007.

Call Number:

070.92 E611C 2007

Pages:

255 pages ; 21 cm.

Subject:

Social Sciences

Summary:
Camelia Entekhabifard was six years old in 1979 when the shah of Iran was overthrown by revolutionary supporters of the Ayatollah Khomeini. By the age of sixteen, she had become a nationally celebrated poet, and at eighteen she was one of the youngest reformist journalists in Tehran. Just eight years later Camelia was imprisoned, held in solitary confinement, and charged with breaching national security and challenging the authority of the Islamic regime. After months of solitary confinement and daily interrogation, Camelia confessed to crimes she did not commit, and came to believe that she was in love with her brutal interrogator.
Publisher:

Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 1993.

Call Number:

KIC 327.41 B632C 1993

Pages:

196 pages ; 24 cm.

Subject:

Social Sciences

Summary:
In this innovative study of the forces that shape the decisions of foreign policy leaders, Michael Blackwell examines the attitudes of British policy makers immediately after World War II and considers their impact on foreign and economic policy. Despite the critical remarks they had made while in opposition, the Ministers in the Labour Cabinet elected in 1945 shared the traditional attitudes of Foreign Office officials regarding Britain's preeminent position in international affairs. Blackwell analyzes the origins of these attitudes and draws a distinction between their cognitive and affective components. The author demonstrates that although the harsh realities of the postwar world weakened the belief that Britain should play a leading role in world affairs at the cognitive level, the heroic victory over the Axis powers strengthened the belief at the affective level. Finding that Britain could no longer play a major part in influencing world events, yet unwilling to contemplate a more modest role, the policymakers accommodated their attitudinal conflicts by seeking the illusion of power. They looked back to the centuries of Imperial expansion, failing to plan for the decades of contraction to come. By clinging to the grandeur of the past, they failed to adjust to the less glorious present and set Britain on the road to many of the economic and political difficulties of later years. This work should be of interest to those concerned with the implications for contemporary US policy as well as to those interested in British history.
Publisher:

Stanford, California : Stanford University Press, 2017.

Call Number:

KIC 363.960973 T136C 2017

Pages:

318 pages.

Subject:

Social Sciences

Summary:
In this book, Aiko Takeuchi-Demirci follows the relationship between two iconic birth control activists, Margaret Sanger in the United States and Ishimoto Shizue in Japan, as well as other intellectuals and policymakers in both countries who supported their campaigns, to make sense of the complex transnational exchanges occurring around contraception. The birth control movement facilitated U.S. expansionism, exceptionalism, and anti-communist policy and was welcomed in Japan as a hallmark of modernity. By telling the story of reproductive politics in a transnational context, Takeuchi-Demirci draws connections between birth control activism and the history of eugenics, racism, and imperialism.
Publisher:

New York : Zed Books, 2009.

Call Number:

KIC 392.50954 D751 2009

Pages:

xi, 245 p. ; 23 cm.

Subject:

Social Sciences

Summary:
The concept of a Dowry, whilst known throughout the world, is one which is much misunderstood and often regarded as synonymous with acts of violence against women. This exciting new volume seeks to debunk the overly simplistic conceptions of Dowry that are produced by a lack of understanding of this cultural practice. Taking a variety of theoretical and active approaches, this work successfully bridges the gap between today's prevailing theory and practice, whilst enshrining the centrality of South Asian women's own experiences as a starting point to any discussion. Through advocating the use of collective processes to liberate women, this book empowers women to be the agents of change as opposed to merely victims.
Publisher:

London ; Verso, 2017.

Call Number:

KIC 323.1196073 F996 2017

Pages:

vi, 266 pages ; 24 cm.

Subject:

Social Sciences

Summary:
Black rebellion has returned. Dramatic protests have risen up in scores of cities and campuses; there is renewed engagement with the history of Black radical movements and thought. Here, key intellectuals¿inspired by the new movements and by the seminal work of the scholar Cedric J. Robinson¿recall the powerful tradition of Black radicalism while defining new directions for the activists and thinkers it inspires. In a time when activists in Ferguson, Palestine, Baltimore, and Hong Kong immediately connect across vast distances, this book makes clear that new Black radical politics is thoroughly internationalist and redraws the links between Black resistance and anti-capitalism. Featuring the key voices in this new intellectual wave, this collection outlines one of the most vibrant areas of thought today.
Publisher:

Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, 2002.

Call Number:

KIC 394 L315H 2002

Pages:

xiii, 160 pages : illustration ; 20 cm.

Subject:

Social Sciences

Summary:
Written in Paris after the heady days of student revolt in May 1968 and before the devastation of the AIDS epidemic, History of Shit is emblematic of a wild and adventurous strain of 1970s' theoretical writing that attempted to marry theory, politics, sexuality, pleasure, experimentation, and humor. Radically redefining dialectical thought and post-Marxist politics, it takes an important--and irreverent--position alongside the works of such postmodern thinkers as Foucault, Deleuze, Guattari, and Lyotard.Laporte's eccentric style and ironic sensibility combine in an inquiry that is provocative, humorous, and intellectually exhilarating. Debunking all humanist mythology about the grandeur of civilization, History of Shit suggests instead that the management of human waste is crucial to our identities as modern individuals--including the organization of the city, the rise of the nation-state, the development of capitalism, and the mandate for clean and proper language. Far from rising above the muck, Laporte argues, we are thoroughly mired in it, particularly when we appear our most clean and hygienic.Laporte's style of writing is itself an attack on our desire for "clean language." Littered with lengthy quotations and obscure allusions, and adamantly refusing to follow a linear argument, History of Shit breaks the rules and challenges the conventions of "proper" academic discourse.
Publisher:

New York : Oxford University Press, 1997.

Call Number:

KIC 323.1197 W721L 1997

Pages:

192 pages ; 24 cm.

Subject:

Social Sciences

Summary:
Robert Williams attempts to write Indians back into Indian law by developing a greater appreciation for the contributions of American Indian legal visions and demonstrating how ancient treaty visions can speak to the modern, multicultural age. Williams maintains there is an important need for a more complete account of the legal visions of the American Indians. In this work, he examines the Indians' role in the history of legal traditions which have determined Indian rights in the USA, including the Indian conceptions of justice, their traditions, and practices. Doing so is essential to protecting Indian tribalism's survival under US law. In addition, understanding how the American Indian legal traditions have worked to help perpetuate Indian tribalism might also assist in beginning to understand how US law may achieve racial justice more generally.
Publisher:

London : Pantheon Books, 2003.

Call Number:

KIC 741.5973 S755M 2003

Pages:

295 pages : chiefly ill. ; 23 cm.

Subject:

Social Sciences

Summary:
Maus is a haunting tale within a tale. Vladek's harrowing story of survival is woven into the author's account of his tortured relationship with his aging father. Against the backdrop of guilt brought by survival, they stage a normal life of small arguments and unhappy visits. This astonishing retelling of our century's grisliest news is a story of survival, not only of Vladek but of the children who survive even the survivors. Maus studies the bloody pawprints of history and tracks its meaning for all of us. This combined, definitive edition includes Maus I: A Survivor's Tale and Maus II.
Publisher:

New York : Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2000.

Call Number:

KIC 305.800973 M243O 2000

Pages:

viii, 584 pages ; 25 cm.

Subject:

Social Sciences

Summary:
Why has a nation founded upon precepts of freedom and universal humanity continually produced, through its preoccupation with race, a divided and constrained populace? Scott Malcomson's search for an answer took him across the country--to the Cherokee Nation, an all-black town, and a white supremacist enclave in Oklahoma--back though the tangled red-white-and-black history of America from colonial times onward, and to his own childhood in racially fractured Oakland, California. By not only recounting our shared tragicomedy of race but helping us to own it--even to embrace it--this important book offers us a way at last to move beyond it.
Publisher:

Stanford, California : Stanford University Press, 2013.

Call Number:

KIC 264.02 A259O 2013

Pages:

xiii, 140 pages ; 23 cm.

Subject:

Social Sciences

Summary:
In this follow-up to The Kingdom and the Glory and The Highest Poverty, Agamben investigates the roots of our moral concept of duty in the theory and practice of Christian liturgy. Beginning with the New Testament and working through to late scholasticism and modern papal encyclicals, Agamben traces the Church's attempts to repeat Christ's unrepeatable sacrifice. Crucial here is the paradoxical figure of the priest, who becomes more and more a pure instrument of God's power, so that his own motives and character are entirely indifferent as long as he carries out his priestly duties. In modernity, Agamben argues, the Christian priest has become the model ethical subject. We see this above all in Kantian ethics. Contrasting the Christian and modern ontology of duty with the classical ontology of being, Agamben contends that Western philosophy has unfolded in the tension between the two. This latest installment in the study of Western political structures begun in Homo Sacer is a contribution to the study of liturgy, an extension of Nietzsche's genealogy of morals, and a reworking of Heidegger's history of Being.
Publisher:

Boston : Northeastern University Press, 2001.

Call Number:

KIC 363.230976855 W377P 2001

Pages:

x, 278 pages : illustrations, map ; 24 cm.

Subject:

Social Sciences

Summary:
While many applaud the apparent successes of community and saturation policing, Neil Websdale contends instead that such law enforcement initiatives oppress rather than protect the poor, particularly African Americans in large urban centers. Based on a groundbreaking ethnographic study of public housing projects in Nashville, Tennessee, he argues persuasively that community policing is a critical component of a criminal justice juggernaut designed to manage or regulate stigmatized populations, much like slave patrols served as agents for social control on Southern plantations. In a work that is sure to stir controversy and heated debate, Websdale draws on extensive field research, documentary sources, and interviews to illuminate how a criminal justice system deeply rooted in racism and slavery destroys the black family, creates a form of selective breeding, and undermines the civil rights gains of the 1960s. Unlike previous studies of community policing, which analyze programs through the lens of law enforcement, this book focuses on the history, experiences, and perspectives of the people whose lives are most affected by today's policing strategies. Skillfully blending the voices of project residents with a rich synthesis of historical, sociological, and criminological analysis, Websdale describes the situational, cultural, and economic circumstances of Nashville's poor; examines the policing of social upheaval by detailing events in the 1997 looting and burning of the Dollar General Store; considers African American kinship systems and the special circumstances of battered women; and discusses why the vice trades -- prostitution and selling drugs -- thrive in public housing projects. Policing the Poor is a much-needed balance to prevailing optimistic views on the effectiveness of this new method of law enforcement.
Publisher:

Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press, 2006.

Call Number:

KIC 306.209595 W429P 2006

Pages:

xiii, 324 pages ; 24 cm.

Subject:

Social Sciences

Summary:
Protest and Possibilities explores the pursuit of political reform in Malaysia, an illiberal democracy, and contrasts coalition-building and reform processes there with those of electoral authoritarian Indonesia. The study considers the roles of civil society agents (CSAs) in promoting alternative (especially noncommunal) political norms and helping to find common ground among opposition political actors, and compares recent reformist initiatives with past political trajectories. The nature of illiberal democracy encourages a combination of contained and transgressive contention, with CSAs and political parties performing distinct but complementary roles. Enough space has been allowed over time for CSAs and political parties to accumulate coalitional capital, or the mutual trust and understanding necessary for groups to find common cause and work in coalition. In addition, shifts in political opportunities and threats encourage both CSAs and political parties to alter their strategies and thinking to take advantage of windows for change, facilitating long-term normative as well as institutional change.
Publisher:

New Delhi, India ; Sage, 2012.

Call Number:

KIC 363.690954 R281 2012

Pages:

xix, 342 pages., [40] pages of plates : illustration ; 25 cm.

Subject:

Social Sciences

Summary:
Presented here is a novel approach to understanding the relationship between the past and the present using the unique concept of re-use, wherein elements from the past are strategically adapted into the present, and thus become part of a new modernity. The book uses this method as a heuristic tool for analyzing and interpreting cultural and political changes and the transnational flow of ideas, concepts and objects. The chapters apply this concept to South Asia but the concept of re-use and the method of its application are both general and amenable to cross-cultural and comparative analysis.
Publisher:

Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, 2009.

Call Number:

KIC 323.1196073 C957R 2009

Pages:

272 pages ; 21 cm.

Subject:

Social Sciences

Summary:
Rebellion or Revolution? collects reviews and essays Harold Cruse wrote between 1950 and 1966 and contains a number of significant writings not available elsewhere. Now this work emerges as both an essential document from a crucial moment in African American history and a road map to the origins and evolution of Cruse¿s critical thought, asserting its importance in today¿s debates on race in America.
Publisher:

Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, 2012.

Call Number:

KIC 305.420952 S555S 2012

Pages:

xxxiv, 271 pages : illustration ; 23 cm.

Subject:

Social Sciences

Summary:
Setsu Shigematsu¿s book is the first to present a sustained history of the formation of ¿man ribu¿a women¿s liberation movement in Japan¿its political philosophy, and its contributions to feminist politics. Through an in-depth analysis of ¿man ribu, Shigematsu furthers our understanding of Japan¿s gender-based modernity and imperialism and expands our perspective on transnational liberation and feminist movements worldwide.
Publisher:

Berkeley : University of California Press, 1999.

Call Number:

KIC 362.7 A676S 1999

Pages:

xvi, 235 pages : illustration ; 23 cm.

Subject:

Social Sciences

Summary:
Searching for Life traces the courageous plight of the Grandmothers of the Plaza de Mayo, a group of women who challenged the ruthless dictatorship that ruled Argentina from 1976 to 1983. Acting as both detectives and human rights advocates in an effort to find and recover their grandchildren, the Grandmothers identified fifty-seven of an estimated 500 children who had been kidnapped or born in detention centers. The Grandmothers' work also led to the creation of the National Genetic Data Bank, the only bank of its kind in the world, and to Article 8 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, the "right to identity," that is now incorporated in the new adoption legislation in Argentina. Rita Arditti has conducted extensive interviews with twenty Grandmothers and twenty-five others connected with their work; her book is a testament to the courage, persistence, and strength of these "traditional" older women.
Publisher:

Ithaca : Cornell University Press, 2017.

Call Number:

KIC 320.15 B988S 2017

Pages:

293 pages..

Subject:

Social Sciences

Summary:
In Secession and Security, Ahsan I. Butt argues that states, rather than separatists, determine whether a secessionist struggle will be peaceful, violent, or genocidal. He investigates the strategies, ranging from negotiated concessions to large-scale repression, adopted by states in response to separatist movements. Variations in the external security environment, Butt argues, influenced the leaders of the Ottoman Empire to use peaceful concessions against Armenians in 1908 but escalated to genocide against the same community in 1915; caused Israel to reject a Palestinian state in the 1990s; and shaped peaceful splits in Czechoslovakia in 1993 and the Norway-Sweden union in 1905.
Publisher:

New York : New York University Press, 2005.

Call Number:

KIC 305.896073 B433D 2005

Pages:

xiii, 492 pages ; 24 cm.

Subject:

Social Sciences

Summary:
Lawyer, activist, teacher, writer: for over 40 years, Derrick Bell has provoked his critics and challenged his readers with uncompromising candor and progressive views on race and class in America. A founder of Critical Race Theory and pioneer of the use of allegorical stories as tools of analysis, Bell's groundbreaking work shatters conventional legal orthodoxies and turns comfortable majoritarian myths inside out. Edited and with an extensive introduction by leading critical race theorists Richard Delgado and Jean Stefancic, The Derrick Bell Reader reflects the tremendous breadth of issues that Bell has grappled with over his phenomenal career, including affirmative action, black nationalism, legal education and ethics. Together, the selections offer the most complete collection of Derrick Bell's writing available today.
Publisher:

Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, 2014.

Call Number:

KIC 371.010973 I343 2014

Pages:

385 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.

Subject:

Social Sciences

Summary:
The Imperial University brings together scholars to explore the policing of knowledge by explicitly linking the academy to the broader politics of militarism, racism, nationalism, and neoliberalism that define the contemporary imperial state. Based on multidisciplinary research, autobiographical accounts, and even performance scripts, this urgent analysis offers sobering insights into varied manifestations of ¿the imperial university.
Publisher:

New York : Columbia University Press, 1996.

Call Number:

KIC 355.03 C968 1996

Pages:

xv, 562 pages : illustration ; 24 cm.

Subject:

Social Sciences

Summary:
Contributors ask whether it is more useful to conceive of the world as arrayed in regional, cultural, institutional complexes or organized along the conventional dimensions of power, alliance, and geography. They argue that perspectives that neglect the roles of culture and identity are no longer adequate to explain the complexities of a world undergoing rapid change.
Publisher:

Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, 2010.

Call Number:

KIC 323 W721D 2010

Pages:

xxxii, 158 pages ; 23 cm.

Subject:

Social Sciences

Summary:
Taking a critical view of a venerated international principle, Randall Williams shows how the concept of human rights¿often taken for granted as a force for good in the world¿corresponds directly with U.S. imperialist aims. The Divided World examines how a human rights¿based international policy is ultimately mobilized to manage violence¿by limiting the access of its victims to justice.
Publisher:

Stanford, California : Stanford University Press, 2013.

Call Number:

KIC 305.800973 B299E 2013

Pages:

xi, 225 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.

Subject:

Social Sciences

Summary:
In The Ethnic Project, Bashi Treitler considers the ethnic history of the United States from the arrival of the English in North America through to the present day. Tracing the histories of immigrant and indigenous groups¿Irish, Chinese, Italians, Jews, Native Americans, Mexicans, Afro-Caribbeans, and African Americans¿she shows how each negotiates America's racial hierarchy, aiming to distance themselves from the bottom and align with the groups already at the top. But in pursuing these "ethnic projects" these groups implicitly accept and perpetuate a racial hierarchy, shoring up rather than dismantling race and racism. Ultimately, The Ethnic Project shows how dangerous ethnic thinking can be in a society that has not let go of racial thinking.
Publisher:

Minneapolis, MN : University of Minnesota Press, 1991.

Call Number:

KIC 307 N176I 1991

Pages:

xli, 176 pages ; 23 cm.

Subject:

Social Sciences

Summary:
In this powerful work, Jean-Luc Nancy examines community as an idea that has dominated modern thought and traces its relation to concepts of experience, discourse, and the individual. Contrary to popular Western notions of community, Nancy shows that it is neither a project of fusion nor production. Rather, he argues, community can be defined through the political nature of its resistance against immanent power.
Publisher:

London ; Verso, 2017.

Call Number:

KIC 303.482 W436L 2017

Pages:

viii, 196 pages : color illustrations ; 22 cm.

Subject:

Social Sciences

Summary:
The notion of a humanitarian ¿lesser evil¿ has become instrumental in justifying the West¿s military adventures. It informs obscene calculations determining how much collateral damage is permissible in conflict. It determines the minimum requirements of survival imposed upon an occupied territory. As Eyal Weizman shows in this brilliant exploration of forensic architecture, this can be seen in particular in the regime imposed upon Gaza by the state of Israel. Examining the damage following the 2010 bombardment, he pieces together the systematic process of destruction, revealing the political atrocity within the debris. The way he gathers together the evidence forces us to rethink our understanding of justice and human rights in the modern world.
Publisher:

Stanford, California : Stanford University Press, 2017.

Call Number:

KIC 305.89155073 M193L 2017

Pages:

235 pages.

Subject:

Social Sciences

Summary:
When Roya, an Iranian American high school student, is asked to identify her race, she feels anxiety and doubt. According to the federal government, she and others from the Middle East are white. Indeed, a historical myth circulates even in immigrant families like Roya's, proclaiming Iranians to be the "original" white race. But based on the treatment Roya and her family receive in American schools, airports, workplaces, and neighborhoods¿interactions characterized by intolerance or hate¿Roya is increasingly certain that she is not white. In The Limits of Whiteness, Neda Maghbouleh offers a groundbreaking, timely look at how Iranians and other Middle Eastern Americans move across the color line. By shadowing Roya and more than 80 other young people, Maghbouleh documents Iranian Americans' shifting racial status. Drawing on never-before-analyzed historical and legal evidence, she captures the unique experience of an immigrant group trapped between legal racial invisibility and everyday racial hyper-visibility. Her findings are essential for understanding the unprecedented challenge Middle Easterners now face under "extreme vetting" and potential reclassification out of the "white" box. Maghbouleh tells for the first time the compelling, often heartbreaking story of how a white American immigrant group can become brown and what such a transformation says about race in America.
Publisher:

London ; Routledge, 1996.

Call Number:

KIC 307.76 S642N 1996

Pages:

xx, 262 pages : illustration, maps ; 24 cm.

Subject:

Social Sciences

Summary:
This book challenges conventional wisdom, which holds gentrification to be the simple outcome of new middle-class tastes and a demand for urban living. It reveals gentrification as part of a much larger shift in the political economy and culture of the late twentieth century. Documenting in gritty detail the conflicts that gentrification brings to the new urban 'frontiers', the author explores the interconnections of urban policy, patterns of investment, eviction, and homelessness. The failure of liberal urban policy and the end of the 1980s financial boom have made the end-of-the-century city a darker and more dangerous place. Public policy and the private market are conspiring against minorities, working people, the poor, and the homeless as never before. In the emerging revanchist city, gentrification has become part of this policy of revenge.
Publisher:

New York : Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, 2014.

Call Number:

KIC 304.2 P419 2014

Pages:

xxxiv, 446 pages ; 26 cm.

Subject:

Social Sciences

Summary:
The People, Place, and Space Reader brings together the writings of scholars, designers, and activists from a variety of fields to make sense of the makings and meanings of the world we inhabit. They help us to understand the relationships between people and the environment at all scales, and to consider the active roles individuals, groups, and social structures play in creating the environments in which people live, work, and play. These readings highlight the ways in which space and place are produced through large- and small-scale social, political, and economic practices, and offer new ways to think about how people engage the environment in multiple and diverse ways.
Publisher:

Monmouth, Rotterdam : Nimbus Records with Rotterdam Conservatory of Music, 2002.

Call Number:

KIC 781.264 R215R 2002

Pages:

viii, 184 pages , 40 pages of plates : illustrations (some coloured) ; 25 cm. +

Subject:

Social Sciences

Summary:
Ragas are complex entities. Performers, who have spent many years acquiring their knowledge, often prefer to keep silent, and in any case few have been taught to approach ragas from an analytical point of view. Musicologists, on the other hand, often lack a thorough practical insight into raga music. The authors of this guide are all well-versed in the theory and practice of raga music. Of the hundreds of ragas that exist, the guide surveys seventy-four of the most performed and well-established ones, with specially commissioned recordings by Hariprasad Chaurasia (flute), Buddhadev DasGupta (sarod), Shruti Sadolikar-Katkar (vocal) and Vidyadhar Vyas (vocal). For each raga the guide provides: An analytical and historical description; transcription of the alap (melodic construction) for each raga as performed on the CDs; ascent-descent and melodic outline in both western and Indian notation; Song texts with English translation (for sung ragas). The Raga Guide includes four CDs with over five hours of music. It will be essential reading for listeners and conoisseurs, students and scholars.
Publisher:

New York : New York University Press, 2013.

Call Number:

KIC 304.873 S957 2013

Pages:

ix, 396 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.

Subject:

Social Sciences

Summary:
The Sun Never Sets collects the work of a generation of scholars who are enacting a shift in the orientation of the field of South Asian American studies. By focusing upon the lives, work, and activism of specific, often unacknowledged, migrant populations, the contributors present a more comprehensive vision of the South Asian presence in the United States.
Publisher:

Stanford, California : Stanford University Press, 2016.

Call Number:

KIC 355.031 K491S 2016

Pages:

xii, 239 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.

Subject:

Social Sciences

Summary:
Tongfi Kim identifies the supply of policy concessions and military commitments as the main factors that explain the bargaining power of a state in a potential or existing alliance. Additionally, three variables of a state's domestic politics significantly affect its negotiating power: whether there is strong domestic opposition to the alliance, whether the state's leader is pro-alliance, and whether that leader is vulnerable. Kim then looks beyond existing alliance literature, which focuses on threats, to produce a deductive theory based on analysis of how the global power structure and domestic politics affect alliances. As China becomes stronger and the U.S. military budget shrinks, The Supply Side of Security shows that these countries should be understood not just as competing threats, but as competing security suppliers.
Publisher:

New York : Seven Stories Press, 2000.

Call Number:

070.92 P746W 2000

Pages:

381 pages, [8] pages of plates : illustration ; 24 cm.

Subject:

Social Sciences

Summary:
War of Words is the amazing story of those years, when beat reporters simply doing their job experienced the vengeance of the militarized apparatus of minority state rule. War of Words is most of all the story of lives turned upside down and, sometimes, of unintended heroism. Pogrund himself, for example, stood trial for a series of articles he wrote on prison abuse. A riveting memoir and a complex commentary on apartheid and freedom of the press, War of Words offers an insider's perspective on one of the most turbulent, and arguably one of the most significant, periods in modern history.
Publisher:

Boston : Beacon Press, 2005.

Call Number:

KIC 323.173090511 N576W 2005

Pages:

xxiii, 187 pages ; 22 cm.

Subject:

Social Sciences

Summary:
In an ironic reversal of the American dream, a staggering 20,000 members of the immigrant community of Midwood, Brooklyn (known as Little Pakistan), voluntarily left the United States after 9/11. Tram Nguyen reveals the human cost of the domestic war on terror and examines the impact of post-9/11 policies on people targeted because of immigration status, nationality, race, and religion. Nguyen's evocative narrative reporting-about the families, detainees, local leaders, community advocates, and others living on the front lines-tells the stories of people who witnessed and experienced firsthand the unjust detainment or deportation of family members, friends, and neighbors.
Publisher:

Boulder, Colo. : Westview Press, 1999.

Call Number:

KIC 305.800973 D352W 1999

Pages:

xv, 247 pages ; 24 cm.

Subject:

Social Sciences

Summary:
Richard Delgado is one of the most evocative and forceful voices writing on the subject of race and law in America today. The New York Times has described him as a ¿pioneer¿ of critical race theory, the bold and provocative movement that, according to the Times ¿will be influencing the practice of law for years to come.¿ Stanley Fish calls his previous book, The Rodrigo Chronicles, a ¿stunning performance.¿ In When Equality Ends: Stories About Race and Resistance, Delgado, adopting his trademark storytelling approach, casts aside the dense, dry language so commonly associated with legal writing, and offers up a series of incisive and compelling conversations about race in America. The characters, a young professor of color, an aging veteran of many civil rights struggles, and a brilliant young conservative, tackle a handful of complex legal and policy questions in an engaging and accessible manner.Has U.S. society quietly ended its commitment to minorities and to racial equality? In these new chronicles, Delgado searches for an answer. The book explores the main normative premise of Alternative Dispute Resolution; examines doctrinalism and legal formalism; questions whether regulation and the free market have failed to alleviate poverty in the colonias settlements of the Southwest; and asks whether Title VII and civil rights laws are necessary in today's legal system. From an examination of the positive role that racial mixture and multiple consciousness will have on America's future to a look at the harmful impact that new human reproductive technologies are likely to have on minorities, Delgado tackles a number of timely and provocative issues. Written for both students and general readers, When Equality Ends: Stories About Race and Resistance provides a highly accessible introduction to critical race theory and the new approach to civil rights.